Your Child’s Voice

Your child’s voice helps them communicate effectively. Help them take care of it!

  1. Encourage them to use a gentle voice or indoor voice. They should avoid yelling or screaming, and even talking loudly. Surprisingly, they should also avoid whispering!
  2. Reduce background noise. If you are in a noisy place, encourage them not to talk. At sports games, use noise makers instead of loud voices.
  3. Get them to avoid making animal or car noises with their voice. When you play with them, talk quietly and gently to encourage them to do so, too.
  4. Teach them to get people’s attention by approaching them and tapping them.
  5. Teach them to avoid talking a lot for extended periods of time.
  6. Make sure they eat well and get enough rest and sleep.
  7. Ensure that they eat at least an hour before bedtime.
  8. Make sure their posture is good and that they breathe well.
  9. Get them to drink water to keep their vocal folds hydrated; hydration is essential for a healthy voice.
  10. Reduce the amount of caffeine they consume – this includes chocolate and pop.
  11. Get them to rest their voice when they have a cold.
  12. Encourage them to cough gently or avoid coughing by sucking on a lozenge or a candy.
  13. Encourage them to swallow instead of clearing their voice.
  14. Avoid having them talk in dusty or smoky places.

I hope this article was helpful! If you have concerns about your child’s voice or your own voice, please contact a Speech-Language Pathologist. SpeechWorks offers Speech-Language Pathology services in Manitoba, in Ontario, on Prince Edward Island, in the Northwest Territories, in the Yukon and in Nunavut.

Taking Care of Your Voice

Your voice is essential for communication – take care of it!

  1. Always use a gentle voice and talk slowly.
  2. Talk loudly enough, but not too loudly.
  3. Avoid talking in noisy places: where there is loud music or in public places.
  4. Avoid imitating animals or cars with your voice.
  5. Do not talk a lot for extended periods of time.
  6. Rest well and eat well.
  7. Make sure your posture is good and breathe well.
  8. Drink water to keep your vocal folds hydrated; hydration is essential to keep your voice healthy.
  9. Rest your voice when you have a cold.
  10. Cough gently or avoid coughing by sucking on a lozenge or a candy.
  11. Swallow instead of clearing your voice.
  12. Avoid talking in dusty or smoky places.
  13. Avoid whispering.
  14. Adopt eating habits that are healthy for the voice : do not eat spicy food and avoid having too much coffee.

I hope this article was helpful! If you have concerns about your own voice or your child’s voice, please contact a Speech-Language Pathologist. SpeechWorks offers Speech-Language Pathology services in Manitoba, in Ontario, on Prince Edward Island, in the Northwest Territories, in the Yukon and in Nunavut.

Voice Volume

Children sometimes have difficulty with voice volume. Some speak too softly and some speak too loudly. Here are some suggestions to help children speak at a regular volume.

  • Use a 5-point scale to tell the children how loud they are and how loud you want them to be. “You are talking with a ‘5’ – a ‘very loud voice’. Please talk with a ‘3’ – a ‘regular voice’.” Here is an example of a 5-point scale for voice volume:

  • The 5-point scale helps many children to understand voice volume because it is colourful and concrete. Numbers are sometimes easier to understand than abstract labels such as “very quiet.” It also helps children to understand that there is a whole range of volume, not just “loud” and “quiet.” In addition, assigning numbers and colours to different volumes seems less judgemental than some labels, and this can help children to stay calm when they are getting feedback.
  • You can find more information about the 5 Point Scale, developed by Kari Dunn Buron, here.
  • If children are usually too loud, point out all the times they are using a “very quiet,” “quiet” or “regular” voice. Point out their successes lots of times before pointing out their difficulties. Once you have labelled a “regular” voice for them lots of times, you can say “That is very loud. Try using a regular voice!”
  • If children are usually too quiet, point out all the times they are using a “very loud,” “loud” or “regular” voice. Once you have labelled a “regular” voice for them lots of times, you can say “That is very quiet. Try using a regular voice.”
  • Give them lots of feedback about voice volume. Tell them “That’s very loud. It hurts my ears,” or “That’s very quiet. I can hardly hear you. I want to hear all your good ideas.”
  • Do lots of activities in which children take turns using different voice volumes. You could ask them to name animals, for example” “Tell me an animal that swims. Use a ‘very loud voice’.” Then you can also give lots of information about the effect of the volume: “That is so loud. I could hear it across the room! It could wake someone up!” “Tell me an animal that has wings. Use a ‘regular voice’.” “Wow – you used a regular voice! It is easy to hear you, and it doesn’t hurt my ears!” Show the children the 5-point scale while doing these activities to give them more visual and concrete support. This is especially fun with a whole group of children.

I hope that this article is helpful! If you have concerns about your child’s speech or language (including voice volume or social use of language), please contact a Speech-Language Pathologist.

SpeechWorks Inc. offers private Speech-Language Pathology services for children and adults in Manitoba, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, the Northwest Territories, the Yukon, and Nunavut.